Index of Primary Co-Cure Pages
Home Page || About Co-Cure || Articles and Posts (Main) || Reading Room || Additional Resources || Let's Work Together || Guestbook || Issue Boards || List Operation || Search this Web site


Posted to Co-Cure Wed, 7 Jun 2000 21:46:06 -0400

Citalopram (Celexa) in patients with fibromyalgia

Citalopram in patients with fibromyalgia - a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.
Authors: Anderberg UM, Marteinsdottir I, von Knorring L
Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience Psychiatry, University Hospital, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
European Journal of Pain (ISSN 1090-3801) 2000 Mar;4(1):27-35
NLM citation: PMID: 10833553

[Citalopram is the anti-depressant Celexa, one of the series of SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors).]

A 4-month trial with 40 FMS patients (21 taking citalopram, 19 taking a placebo) assessed pain, depressive symptoms and physical functioning using Visual Analogue Scales (VAS), the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the Fibrositis Impact Questionnaire (FIQ). The various scales produced conflicting data ranging from no improvement, to improvement which declined over time, to definite improvement in some symptoms. For details, see:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10833553&dopt=Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Tue, 6 Jun 2000 14:11:41 -0400

Difference in patterns of motor and cognitive function in CFS and severe depressive illness

The difference in patterns of motor and cognitive function in chronic fatigue syndrome and severe depressive illness.
Authors: Lawrie SM, MacHale SM, Cavanagh JT, O'Carroll RE, Goodwin GM
Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of Edinburgh
Psychological Medicine (ISSN 0033-2917) 2000 Mar;30(2):433-42
NLM citations: PMID: 10824663, UI: 20282747

Thirty patients with CFS, 20 with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 15 healthy controls were given a battery of motor and cognitive tests, including measures of psychomotor speed, memory, and maximal voluntary muscle contraction. CFS patients generally performed worse on cognitive tests than healthy controls, but better than patients with MDD. Both patient groups had markedly impaired motor function compared with healthy controls. MDD subjects showed a significantly greater diurnal improvement in maximal voluntary contraction than healthy controls. The authors concluded that diurnal changes in some functions in MDD may differentiate the disorder from CFS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10824663&dopt=Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Tue, 6 Jun 2000 14:06:03 -0400

Responses of the sympathetic nervous system and the HPA axis to interleukin-6: a pilot study in fibromyalgia

Responses of the sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to interleukin-6: a pilot study in fibromyalgia.
Authors: Torpy DJ, Papanicolaou DA, Lotsikas AJ, Wilder RL, Chrousos GP, Pillemer SR
Affiliation: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
Journal: Arthritis Rheum (ISSN 0004-3591) 2000 Apr;43(4):872-80
NLM citations: PMID: 10765933, UI: 20227000

The authors injected patients and controls with interleukin-6 to determine whether deficient activity of the hypothalamic corticotropin- releasing hormone (CRH) neuron, may cause fibromyalgia (FM). Patients had exaggerated NE responses, heart rate increases, and delayed ACTH release, responses which support the notion that FM may represent a primary disorder of the stress system.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10765933&dopt=Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Thu, 1 Jun 2000 17:54:43 -0400

Motor cortical dysfunction disclosed by single and double magnetic stimulation in patients with fibromyalgia

Motor cortical dysfunction disclosed by single and double magnetic stimulation in patients with fibromyalgia.
Authors: Salerno A, Thomas E, Olive P, Blotman F, Picot MC, Georgesco M
Affiliation: Unite d'explorations fonctionnelles neuro-musculaires, Hopital Gui-de-Chauliac, 34295 Montpellier 5, Cedex, France
Journal: Clinical Neurophysiology (ISSN 1388-2457) 2000 Jun 1;111(6):994-1001
NLM citation: PMID: 10825705

The authors investigated the motor cortex in patients with fibromyalgia, using single and double magnetic stimulation. They found motor cortical dysfunction involving excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms, indicating motor cortical involvement and supporting the hypothesis of aberrant central pain mechanisms. The absence of differences between fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis suggested that the lesions were not specific and could be related to chronic pain disorders within the central nervous system.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10825705&dopt=Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Thu, 1 Jun 2000 12:43:25 -0400

Nutritional Supplementation with Chlorella pyrenoidosa for patients with fibromyalgia syndrome: a pilot study

Nutritional Supplementation with Chlorella pyrenoidosa for patients with fibromyalgia syndrome: a pilot study.
Authors: Merchant RE, Carmack CA, Wise CM
Affiliation: Departments of Anatomy and Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Medical College of Virginia Richmond, VA 23298-0709, USA.
Journal: Phytotherapy Research (ISSN 0951-418X) 2000 May;14(3):167-173
NLM citation: PMID: 10815009

This 2-month pilot study evaluated the use of nutritional supplements derived from the unicellular green alga, Chlorella pyrenoidosa, to improve health status in patients with moderately severe symptoms of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). As a group, patients experienced a 22% decrease in pain intensity. Blood samples indicated no significant alterations in serum chemistries, formed elements, and circulating lymphocyte subsets. Seven patients felt they had improved, six reported no change, and five felt worse.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10815009&dopt=Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Mon, 29 May 2000 21:21:01 -0400

Use of the Functional Bowel Disorder Severity Index (FBDSI) in a study of patients with IBS and FMS

Use of the Functional Bowel Disorder Severity Index (FBDSI) in a study of patients with the irritable bowel syndrome and fibromyalgia.
Authors: Sperber AD, Carmel S, Atzmon Y, Weisberg I, Shalit Y, Neumann L, Fich A, Friger M, Buskila D
Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Soroka Medical Center and Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel.
American Journal of Gastroenterology (ISSN 0002-9270) 2000 Apr;95(4):995-8
NLM citations: PMID: 10763949, UI: 20225019

The authors evaluated the Functional Bowel Disorder Severity Index (FBDSI) as a measure of severity of disease among patients with the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), those with both IBS and fibromyalgia (FMS), and matched controls. The Index was found to have an association with IBS patient status: healthy controls had the lowest scores, followed by IBS patients without FMS and then by patients with both IBS and FMS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10763949&dopt=Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Mon, 29 May 2000 17:57:43 -0400

Prevalence of Fatigue and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Like Illness in Children and Adolescents

Prevalence of Fatigue and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Like Illness in Children and Adolescents
Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 6(1) 2000
Karen M. Jordan, PhD; Penny M. Ayers, BA; Susan C. Jahn, BA; Kari K. Taylor, BA; Judith Richman, PhD; Leonard A. Jason, PhD

ABSTRACT.
A community-based screening of over 12,000 households was conducted in order to determine the prevalence of fatigue and CFS-like illness in a sample of 5- to 17-year olds. Results indicate that over 4% of the sample was fatigued and that 2.05% were diagnosed with CFS-like illness. Adolescents had a slightly higher rate of CFS-like illness (2.91%) than did pre-pubescent children (1.96%). Those with CFS-like illness were almost evenly divided between male (47.5%) and female (52.5%). Youngsters of Latino origin had the highest representation in the CFS-like group. Symptom data, family patterns, and other data are presented for both the CFS-like group and the entire sample.

[Note: The full article can be read by clicking here.]

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Tue, 23 May 2000 19:44:52 -0400

Integrity of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor system maintained in CFS

Integrity of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor system is maintained in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.
Authors: Cleare AJ, Sookdeo SS, Jones J, O'Keane V, Miell JP
Department of Psychological Medicine, Guy's King's and St. Thomas' School of Medicine, and the Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK,   E-Mail: a.cleare@iop.kcl.ac.uk
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (ISSN 0021-972X) 2000 Apr;85(4):1433-9
NLM citations: PMID: 10770178, UI: 20230947

Using 37 medication-free patients and 37 controls, the authors assessed indexes of growth hormone (GH) and GH function before and after treatment with low dose hydrocortisone. They found no differences between patients and controls except for a marginally reduced suppression of IGFBP-1 during the insulin stress test. They state there is no evidence of GH deficiency in CFS, and that at the doses used, hydrocortisone treatment appears to have little impact on GH function.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10770178&dopt=Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Sun, 21 May 2000 16:36:31 -0400

Premovement and Cognitive Brain Potentials in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Premovement and Cognitive Brain Potentials in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (The Haworth Medical Press, an imprint of The Haworth Press, Inc.)
Vol. 5, No. 3/4, 1999, pp. 137-148.
Ronald Gordon, H. J. Michalewski, T. Nguyen, Arnold Starr

SUMMARY.
Brain potentials from normals and patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) were recorded in four different experimental tasks: (1) Auditory target detection, (2) Short-term memory scanning, (3) Fore-warned reaction time (contingent negative variation), and (4) Self-paced movement. In the auditory target detection task, a slow negative potential shift (maximum at Cz), appears prior to stimulus onset in normals, but is markedly reduced in amplitude in patients with CFS.

However, all other sensory and cognitive brain potentials do not differ between normals and CFS. Reaction times are slower in CFS compared to normals. In the memory task, a slow negative shift associated with memory scanning is reduced in patients with CFS. For the fore-warned reaction time and self-paced movement tasks, no differences were found between the patients and normals. The finding of premovement related potential abnormalities in CFS supports the concept that central motor preparation and execution are impaired in CFS. In certain tasks, measures of neural processes related to sensory processing and attention are normal for these patients. Results from the memory task suggest that neural processes related to short-term memory are also altered in CFS.

[Note: The full article can be read by clicking here.]

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Wed, 10 May 2000 14:00:16 -0400

Elevated, sustained peroxynitrite levels as the cause of chronic fatigue syndrome

Elevated, sustained peroxynitrite levels as the cause of chronic fatigue syndrome.
Author: Pall ML
Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry/Biophysics and Program in Basic Medical Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman 99164-4660, USA.   E-Mail: pall@mail.wsu.edu
Journal: Medical Hypotheses [ISSN 0306-9877] 2000 Jan;54(1):115-25
NLM citations: PMID: 10790736, UI: 20250360

The author proposes the cause of CFS to be viral or bacterial infection inducing one or more cytokines, IL-1beta IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma, leading through a chain reaction to generation of the oxidant http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10790736&dopt=Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Tue, 9 May 2000 16:48:50 -0400

Is there any relationship between eosinophilia myalgiaI syndrome (EMS) and fibromyalgia syndrome?

Is there any relationship between eosinophilia myalgia syndrome (EMS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS)? An analysis of clinical and immunological data.
Authors: Barth H, Berg PA, Klein R
Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, University of Tubingen, Germany.
Journal: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (ISBN 0065-2598) 1999;467:487-96
NLM citations: PMID: 10721092, UI: 20185870

[Moderator's note: See http://www.graylab.ac.uk/cgi-bin/omd?query=eosinophilia-myalgia+&action=Search+OMD for a definition of eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome (EMS)]

Because EMS caused by intake of contaminated L-tryptophan resembles fibromyalgia in its clinical presentation, the authors studied groups of patients with each disease and concluded that "EMS may have developed in patients suffering primarily from FMS as an allergic reaction towards a more immunogenic L-tryptophan preparation."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10721092&dopt=Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Mon, 24 Apr 2000 01:33:51 -0400

U.S. Case Definition of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Diagnostic and Theoretical Issues

U.S. Case Definition of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Diagnostic and Theoretical Issues
Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Vol. 5 (3/4) 1999
Authors: Leonard A. Jason, Caroline P. King, Judith A. Richman, Renee R. Taylor, Susan R. Torres, Sharon Song

SUMMARY.
In 1994, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) developed a revised case definition of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) (1), a complex illness characterized by debilitating fatigue and a number of accompanying flu-like symptoms. Although Fukuda and associates intended to resolve complexities surrounding the classification of individuals with CFS stemming from previous definitional criteria (1), significant problems with the revised criteria endure. This article highlights reliability issues and other conceptual and operational difficulties inherent in the current U.S. definition of CFS (1). We employ case studies derived from a community-based epidemiological study of chronic fatigue syndrome (2) to illustrate examples of the potential for misclassification of individuals with CFS using the current U.S. criteria (1). Moreover, we suggest alternative approaches to classification and ways to operationalize specific concepts embedded in the current U.S. criteria (1).

[Note: The full article can be read by clicking here.]

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Thu, 20 Apr 2000 21:39:55 -0400

Comorbid fibromyalgia accounts for reduced fertility in women with myofascial face pain

Comorbid fibromyalgia accounts for reduced fecundity in women with myofascial face pain.
Authors: Raphael KG, Marbach JJ
Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, New Jersey Medical School, and School of Oral Biology, Pathology, and Diagnostic Sciences, New Jersey Dental School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark 07107, USA. $nbsp E-Mail: raphaekg@umdnj.edu
Clinical Journal of Pain (ISSN 0749-8047) 2000 Mar;16(1):29-36
NLM citations: PMID: 10741816, UI: 20203860

[Moderator's note: comorbid=co-existent; fecundity=fertility]

The authors examined factors related to reduced fertility among women with myofascial face pain (MFP) arising from a hypotheses concerning the role of neurohormonal factors in MFP and associated conditions. They found that the reduced fertility was restricted to the subgroup of MFP cases who reported a history of fibromyalgia.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10741816&dopt=Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Thu, 20 Apr 2000 10:27:08 -0400 by Chuck Engel

Association of chronic widespread pain with mental disorder

[Moderator's note: The following is an alternate interpretation of an abstract summary posted yesterday.]

From: Chuck Engel Charles.Engel@NA.AMEDD.ARMY.MIL

As an epidemiologist, I believe the interpretation below to be a misinterpretation (or, at least, a misleading interpretation). In truth, there was a greater than 3 fold increase in mental disorders in those with widespread pain than without. One can never demonstrate "cause and effect" using a single cross-sectional study. One needs either experimental evidence to do that (not possible in this instance) or numerous studies demonstrating consistency and strength of association across different study methodologies, appropriate temporal sequence (mental disorder before pain rather than vice versa), biological plausibility, and a dose-response relationship (more or greater severity of mental disorder associated with more frequent or severe pain). Since the prevalence of mental disorder in the CWP group was 17%, it would suggest that EVEN IF a cause-effect relationship were responsible, that the majority of patients with CWP do not have a mental disorder and therefore their pain must be due to something else (including a host of biomedical and/or other psychosocial explanations).

Chuck Engel

-----Original Message-----
The association between chronic widespread pain and mental disorder: a population-based study.
Authors: Benjamin S, Morris S, McBeth J, Macfarlane GJ, Silman AJ
Affiliation: University of Manchester, UK.
Journal: Arthritis and Rheumatism (ISSN 0004-3591) 2000 Mar;43(3):561-7
NLM citations: PMID: 10728749, UI: 20191093

The authors studied almost 2000 subjects to investigate whether there is an increased prevalence of mental disorder in people with CWP (chronic widespread pain). The study was unable to demonstrate a cause-and-effect relationship, with only a slightly larger percentage of those with CWP vs. those without CWP being estimated to have a psychiatric diagnosis. Most subjects who did have mental disorders were diagnosed as having mood and anxiety disorders, with only 3 cases of somatoform disorders identified (all of which were associated with pain.)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10728749&dopt=Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Tue, Tue, 18 Apr 2000 21:40:28 -0400

The effect of melatonin in patients with fibromyalgia: a pilot study

The effect of melatonin in patients with fibromyalgia: a pilot study.
Authhors: Citera G, Arias MA, Maldonado-Cocco JA, Lazaro MA, Rosemffet MG, Brusco LI, Scheines EJ, Cardinalli DP
Affiliation: Rheumatology Section, Instituto de Rehabilitacion Psicofisica and Department of Physiology, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Journal: Clinical Rheumatology (ISSN 0770-3198) 2000;19(1):9-13
PMID: 10752492, UI: 20214157

The authors studied the effects melatonin on tender point count, pain, sleep disturbance, fatigue, depression, anxiety, and patient and physician global assessments. They also measured Urine 6-sulphatoxymelatonin levels (aMT-6S). Significant improvement was seen in tender point count and severity of pain at selected points, patient and physician global assessments, and sleep. Lower levels of aMT-6S were found in FM patients compared with normal median controls.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10752492&dopt=Abstract

[ back to index ]


Contact Co-Cure support personnel through our on-line form or
by sending an email message to Co-Cure-Mod@listserv.nodak.edu.

Note: All abstract summaries, unless otherwise noted, were prepared by Margaret Bailey.


Home Page || About Co-Cure || Articles and Posts (Main) || Reading Room || Additional Resources || Let's Work Together || Guestbook || Issue Boards || Search this Web site

Copyright© 1996-2005 Co-Cure
Last Revision: January 16, 2005
Please report any problems with this page to the Webmaster