Index of Primary Co-Cure Pages
Home Page || About Co-Cure || Articles and Posts (Main) || Reading Room || Additional Resources || Let's Work Together || Guestbook || Issue Boards || List Operation || Search this Web site


Posted to Co-Cure Wed, 6 Dec 2000 15:45:30 -0500 by Kimberly Hare

Serotonergic markers and lowered plasma branched-chain-amino acid concentrations in FM

Full Title: Serotonergic markers and lowered plasma branched-chain-amino acid concentrations in fibromyalgia.
Journal: Psychiatry Res 2000 Dec 4;97(1):11-20
Authors: Maes M, Verkerk R, Delmeire L, Van Gastel A, van Hunsel F, Scharpe S
Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry & Neuropsychology, University Hospital of Maastricht, Postbus 5800, 6202 AZ, Maastricht, The Netherlands
NLM Citation: PMID: 11104853

The aims of the present study were to examine serotonergic markers, i.e. [3H]paroxetine binding characteristics and the availability of plasma tryptophan, the precursor of serotonin (5-HT), and the plasma concentrations of the branched chain amino acids (BCAAs), valine, leucine and isoleucine, in fibromyalgia.

The [3H]paroxetine binding characteristics, B(max) and K(d) values, and tryptophan and the competing amino acids (CAA), known to compete for the same cerebral uptake mechanism (i.e. valine, leucine, isoleucine, phenylalanine and tyrosine), were determined in fibromyalgia patients and normal controls.

There were no significant differences in the [3H]paroxetine binding characteristics (B(max) and K(d)) between fibromyalgia and control subjects. There were no significant differences in plasma tryptophan or the tryptophan/CAA ratio between fibromyalgia patients and normal controls. In the fibromyalgia patients, there were no significant correlations between [3H]paroxetine binding characteristics or the availability of tryptophan and myalgic or depressive symptoms. Patients with fibromyalgia had significantly lower plasma concentrations of the three BCAAs (valine, leucine and isoleucine) and phenylalanine than normal controls.

It is hypothesized that the relative deficiency in the BCAAs may play a role in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia, since the BCAAs supply energy to the muscle and regulate protein synthesis in the muscles. A supplemental trial with BCAAs in fibromyalgia appears to be justified.

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Wed, 6 Dec 2000 12:56:37 -0800 by Melissa O'Toole

DHEA response to low-dose ACTH in CFS...

Full Title: A preliminary study of dehydroepiandrosterone response to low-dose ACTH in chronic fatigue syndrome and in healthy subjects.
Journal: Psychiatry Res 2000 Dec 4;97(1):21-28
Authors: Scott LV, Svec F, Dinan T
Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Trinity College Medical School, St. James' Hospital, 8, Dublin, Ireland
NLM Citation: PMID: 11104854

Abnormalities of the production of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), the adrenal androgen, have been linked with disorders such as obesity and psychological disorders such as major depression. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) is the primary stimulant of DHEA, and cortisol, from the adrenal.

We chose to examine the DHEA and DHEA/cortisol response to the novel low-dose ACTH test in healthy subjects and a cohort with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS): this test is useful in assessing subtle irregularities of pituitary-adrenal activity.

Nineteen CFS subjects (diagnosed by CDC criteria) and 10 healthy subjects were examined. We demonstrated that 1 mug ACTH significantly elevates DHEA levels, with no difference in output between CFS and healthy subjects.

The DHEA/cortisol ratio decreased in response to ACTH stimulation in healthy subjects but not in the CFS cohort. We suggest this divergence of response between the two groups represents an imbalance in the relative synthetic pathways of the CFS group which, if present chronically and if comparable to daily stressors, may manifest itself as an inappropriate response to stress.

This difference may be important in either the genesis or propagation of the syndrome.

Full Text

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Sat, 2 Dec 2000 12:53:11 -0500 by Kimberly Hare

A naturalistic evaluation of cortisol secretion in persons with FM and RA

Full Title: A naturalistic evaluation of cortisol secretion in persons with fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis.
Journal: Arthritis Care Res 2000 Feb;13(1):51-61
Authors: Catley D, Kaell AT, Kirschbaum C, Stone AA
Affiliation: Department of Psychology, State University of New York at Stony Brook 11794-8790, USA.
NLM Citations: PMID: 11094926, UI: 20546666

OBJECTIVE: To compare cortisol levels, diurnal cycles of cortisol, and reactivity of cortisol to psychological stress in fibromyalgia (FM) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in their natural environment, and to examine the effect on results of accounting for differences among the groups in psychological stress and other lifestyle and psychosocial variables.

METHODS: Participants were 21 FM patients, 18 RA patients, and 22 healthy controls. Participants engaged in normal daily activities were signaled with a preprogrammed wristwatch alarm to complete a diary (assessing psychosocial- and lifestyle-related variables) or provide a saliva sample (for cortisol assessment). Participants were signaled to provide 6 diary reports and 6 saliva samples on each of two days. Reports of sleep quality and sleep duration were also made upon awakening.

RESULTS: FM and RA patients had higher average cortisol levels than controls; however, there were no differences between the groups in diurnal cycles of cortisol or reactivity to psychological stress. While the groups differed on stress measures, surprisingly, the patient groups reported less stress. Furthermore, statistically accounting for psychosocial- and lifestyle-related differences between the groups did not change the cortisol findings.

CONCLUSION: The results provide additional evidence of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis disturbance in FM and RA patients. While such elevations are consistent with other studies of chronically stressed groups, the elevations in cortisol in this study did not appear to be due to ongoing daily stress, and there was no evidence of disturbed cortisol reactivity to acute stressors.

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Fri, 1 Dec 2000 11:53:46 -0500 by Kimberly Hare

Prevalence of fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain

Full Title: Prevalence of fibromyalgia and chronic widespread pain.
Journal: Scand J Prim Health Care 2000 Sep;18(3):149-53
Authors: Lindell L, Bergman S, Petersson IF, Jacobsson LT, Herrstrom P
Affiliation: Primary Care Centre Hertig Knut, Halmstad, Sweden.
NLM Citations: PMID: 11097099, UI: 20546841

OBJECTIVE: To explore the prevalence of fibromyalgia and chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain in a general population using the criteria of the American College of Rheumatology from 1990.

DESIGN: Structured interview and clinical examination, including tender-point count and pain threshold measured with a dolorimeter, of subjects with suspected chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain.

SETTING: The general population in south-west Sweden 1995-1996.

SUBJECTS: 303 individuals with suspected chronic widespread pain were identified in a previously defined cohort containing 2425 men and women aged 20-74 years. 202 individuals were invited and 147 agreed to participate.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Tenderpoint count, pain threshold and prevalence of chronic widespread pain and fibromyalgia. RESULTS: The prevalence of fibromyalgia was estimated to 1.3% (95% CI 0.8-1.7; n = 2425) and that of all chronic widespread pain to 4.2% (95% CI 3.4-5.0; n = 2425). The mean pain threshold measured with a dolorimeter was lower in subjects with chronic widespread pain (p < 0.01) and correlated with the number of tender points (r = -0.59, p < 0.01) but could not be used to distinguish the subjects with fibromyalgia.

CONCLUSION: Compared to other studies, fibromyalgia and chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain seemed to be relatively rare conditions in the south-west of Sweden.

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Fri, 1 Dec 2000 11:48:44 -0500 by Kimberly Hare

Quality of life issues for fibromyalgia patients

Full Title: Quality of life issues for fibromyalgia patients.
Journal: Arthritis Care Res 2000 Feb;13(1):42-50
Authors: Bernard AL, Prince A, Edsall P
Affiliation: Health Promotion and Education Program, University of Cincinnati, OH 45221-0002, USA.
NLM Citations: PMID: 11094925, UI: 20546665

Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Tue, 28 Nov 2000 17:27:48 -0500 by Kimberly Hare

Stress and rheumatic diseases

Full Title: Stress and rheumatic diseases.
Journal: Rheum Dis Clin North Am 2000 Nov;26(4):737-63, viii
Authors: Herrmann M, Scholmerich J, Straub RH
Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, University Medical Center, Regensburg, Bavaria, Germany.
NLM Citations: PMID: 11084942, UI: 20537112

Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Thu, 30 Nov 2000 16:58:41 -0500 by Fred Springfield

Living with chronic fatigue syndrome

Full Title: "I could not lift my arm holding the fork...". Living with chronic fatigue syndrome.
Journal: Scand J Prim Health Care 2000 Sep;18(3):165-9
Authors: Soderlund A, Skoge AM, Malterud K
Affiliation: Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway.
NLM Citations: PMID: 11097102, UI: 20546844

Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Fri, 24 Nov 2000 0:03:47 -0600 by Fred Springfield

Exercise Capacity in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Full Title: Exercise Capacity in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.
Journal: Arch Intern Med 2000 Nov 27;160(21):3270-3277
Authors: De Becker P, Roeykens J, Reynders M, McGregor N, De Meirleir K
Affiliation: Human Performance Laboratory and Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Physical Education and Physical Therapy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, LK-Third Floor, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels, Belgium.
E-Mail: pdbeck@minf.vub.ac.be
NLM Citation: PMID: 11088089

Article

Analysis and commentary by Dr. E.M. Goudsmit

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Thu, 23 Nov 2000 23:47:12 -0600 by Melissa O'Toole

Abnormalities in response to vasopressin infusion in CFS

Full Title: Abnormalities in response to vasopressin infusion in chronic fatigue syndrome.
Journal: Psychoneuroendocrinology 2001 Feb 1;26(2):175-188
Authors: Altemus M, Dale JK, Michelson D, Demitrack MA, Gold PW, Straus SE
Affiliation: Weill Medical College, Cornell University, Box 244, 1300 York Avenue, 10021, New York, NY, USA
NLM Citation: PMID: 11087963

Article

Analysis and commentary by Dr. E.M. Goudsmit

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Wed, 22 Nov 2000 11:53:28 -0500 by Kimberly Hare

Neuroendocrine perturbations in fibromyalgia and CFS

Full Title: Neuroendocrine perturbations in fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome.
Journal: Rheum Dis Clin North Am 2000 Nov;26(4):989-1002
Authors: Neeck G, Crofford LJ
Affiliation: Department of Rheumatology, University of Giessen, Bad Nauheim, Germany.
E-Mail: gunther.neeck@kerckhoff.med.uni-giessen.de
NLM Citations: PMID: 11084955, UI: 20537125

Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Tue, 28 Nov 2000 12:49:50 -0500

Responsiveness of fibromyalgia clinical trial outcome measures

Full Title: Responsiveness of fibromyalgia clinical trial outcome measures.
Journal: J Rheumatol 2000 Nov;27(11):2683-91
Authors: Dunkl PR, Taylor AG, McConnell GG, Alfano AP, Conaway MR
Affiliation: Center for the Study of Complementary and Alternative Therapies, University of Virginia, Charlottesville 22903-3395, USA.
NLM Citations: PMID: 11093454, UI: 20543783

Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Tue, 28 Nov 2000 12:49:50 -0500

A general population study of fibromyalgia tender points in noninstitutionalized adults with chronic widespread pain

Full Title: A general population study of fibromyalgia tender points in noninstitutionalized adults with chronic widespread pain.
Journal: J Rheumatol 2000 Nov;27(11):2677-82
Authors: White KP, Harth M, Speechley M, Ostbye T
Affiliations: Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
E-Mail: kevin.white@lhsc.on.ca
NLM Citations: PMID: 11093453, UI: 20543782

Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Tue, 28 Nov 2000 12:49:50 -0500

Fibromyalgia: can one distinguish it from simulation? An observer-blind controlled study

Full Title: Fibromyalgia: can one distinguish it from simulation? An observer-blind controlled study.
Journal: J Rheumatol 2000 Nov;27(11):2671-6
Authors: Khostanteen I, Tunks ER, Goldsmith CH, Ennis J
Afiliation: Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
NLM Citations: PMID: 11093452, UI: 20543781

Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Tue, 28 Nov 2000 12:49:50 -0500

Validity and responsiveness of the 6 minute walk test for people with fibromyalgia

Full Title: Validity and responsiveness of the 6 minute walk test for people with fibromyalgia.
Journal: J Rheumatol 2000 Nov;27(11):2666-70
Authors: Pankoff B, Overend T, Lucy D, White K
Affiliation: London Health Sciences Centre, and School of Physical Therapy, University of Western Ontario, Ontario, Canada.
NLM Citations: PMID: 11093451, UI: 20543780

Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Tue, 28 Nov 2000 12:49:50 -0500

Dysautonomia among patients with fibromyalgia: a noninvasive assessment

Full Title: Dysautonomia among patients with fibromyalgia: a noninvasive assessment.
Journal: J Rheumatol 2000 Nov;27(11):2660-5
Authors: Raj SR, Brouillard D, Simpson CS, Hopman WM, Abdollah H
Affiliation: Department of Medicine and Mackenzie Health Services Research, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
NLM Citations: PMID: 11093450, UI: 20543779

Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Tue, 28 Nov 2000 12:49:50 -0500

Patients with fibromyalgia have normal serum levels of hyaluronic acid

Full Title: Patients with fibromyalgia have normal serum levels of hyaluronic acid.
Journal: J Rheumatol 2000 Nov;27(11):2658-9
Authors: Bliddal H, Moller HJ, Schaadt M, Danneskiold-Samsoe B
Affiliation: Department of Rheumatology, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
E-Mail: henning.bliddal@fh.hosp.dk
NLM Citations: PMID: 11093449, UI: 20543778

Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Sat, 18 Nov 2000 20:36:48 -0500 by Kimberly Hare

Lipid profile in patients with fibromyalgia and myofascial pain syndromes

Full Title: Lipid profile in patients with fibromyalgia and myofascial pain syndromes.
Journal: Yonsei Med J 2000 Oct;41(5):541-5
Authors: Ozgocmen S, Ardicoglu O
Affiliation: Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Ankara State Hospital,Turkey.
E-Mail: sozgocmen@hotmail.com
NLM Citations: PMID: 11079612, UI: 20529996

Abstract

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Thu, 9 Nov 2000 23:20:09 -0500 by Fred Springfield

Motor cortex excitability in chronic fatigue syndrome

Full Title: Motor cortex excitability in chronic fatigue syndrome.
Journal: Clin Neurophysiol 2000 Nov 1;111(11):2025-2031
Authors: Starr A, Scalise A, Gordon R, Michalewski HJ, Caramia MD
Affiliation: Department of Neurology, University of California, CA 92697-4290, Irvine, USA
NLM Citation: PMID: 11068238

Abstract
Objective: To use transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to definene motor cortical excitability in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) subjects during a repetitive, bilateral finger movement task.

Methods: A total of 14 CFS patients were tested and compared with 14 age-matched healthy control subjects. TMS of the motor cortex (5% above threshold) was used to elicit motor evoked potentials (MEPs). Subjects performed regular (3-4/s) repetitive bilateral opening-closing movements of the index finger onto the thumb. MEPs of the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) were measured before, immediately following exercise periods of 30, 60 and 90 s, and after 15 min of rest.

Results: Performance, defined by rate of movement, was significantly slower in CFS subjects (3.5/s) than in controls (4.0/s) independent of the hand measured. The rate, however, was not significantly affected by the exercise duration for either group. The threshold of TMS to evoke MEPs from the FDI muscle was significantly higher in CFS than in control subjects, independent of the hemisphere tested. A transient post-exercise facilitation of MEP amplitudes immediately after the exercise periods was present in controls independent of the hemisphere tested, but was absent in CFS subjects. A delayed facilitation of MEPs after 15-30 min of rest was restricted to the non-dominant hemisphere in controls; delayed facilitation was absent in CFS subjects.

Conclusions: Individuals with CFS do not show the normal fluctuations of motor cortical excitability that accompany and follow non-fatiguing repetitive bimanual finger movements.

Keywords: Transcranial magnetic stimulation; Non-fatiguing finger movements; Exercise; Hemisphere asymmetry; Post-exercise facilitation; Delayed facilitation

Full Text

[ back to index ]


Posted to Co-Cure Thu, 9 Nov 2000 23:22:59 -0500 by Fred Springfield

The capnography head-up tilt test for evaluation of CFS

Full Title: The capnography head-up tilt test for evaluation of chronic fatigue syndrome.
Journal: Semin Arthritis Rheum 2000 Oct;30(2):79-86
Authors: Naschitz JE, Rosner I, Rozenbaum M, Gaitini L, Bistritzki I, Zuckerman E, Sabo E, Yeshurun D
Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine A, Bnai Zion Medical Center and Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.
NLM Citations: PMID: 11071579, UI: 20521258

Abstract

[ back to index ]


Contact Co-Cure support personnel through our on-line form or
by sending an email message to Co-Cure-Mod@listserv.nodak.edu.

Note: All abstract summaries, unless otherwise noted, were prepared by Margaret Bailey.


Home Page || About Co-Cure || Articles and Posts (Main) || Reading Room || Additional Resources || Let's Work Together || Guestbook || Issue Boards || Search this Web site

Copyright© 1996-2005 Co-Cure
Last Revision: January 16, 2005
Please report any problems with this page to the Webmaster