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Posted to Co-Cure Mon, 30 Aug 1999 14:57:47 -0400

NIDRR interested in funding CFS Research (U.S.)

From: "Vicki C. Walker"

The National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR, a division of the Department of Education) further clarified that it is interested in funding CFS research. In its "Notice of Final Long-Range Plan for Fiscal Years 1999-2004" CFS is included in its "emerging universe of disabilities" that it has identified as a funding priority.

The inclusion of CFS in NIDRR's long-range plan is the result of comments submitted to NIDRR by The CFIDS Association of America in March 1999. The Association specifically requested that CFS be included in NIDRR's definition of the "emerging universe of disability" to explicitly demonstrate its interest in funding high-quality research in this area.

This long-range plan will become effective on September 30, 1999. For more information about the plan, visit the website:

http://www.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/other/1999-3/082099a.html

For more information about funding opportunities at the Department of Education, including NIDRR, visit the website:

http://www.ed.gov/funding.html

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Posted to Co-Cure Sat, 21 Aug 1999 22:24:27 -0400

Vitamin B status in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

Vitamin B status in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.
Authors: Heap LC, Peters TJ, Wessely S
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, King's College School of Medicine, London, UK.
Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 1999 Apr;92(4):183-5
NLM citations: PMID: 10450194, UI: 99378688

The authors assessed functional status for the B vitamins pyridoxine, riboflavin and thiamine in 12 vitamin-untreated CFS patients and in 18 healthy controls matched for age and sex. For all three enzymes tested, basal activity was lower in CFS patients than in controls, although the activation ratios did not differ between the groups. The authors concluded that these results provide "preliminary evidence of reduced functional B vitamin status, particularly of pyridoxine, in CFS patients."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10450194&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Sat, 21 Aug 1999 22:28:27 -0400

Small adrenal glands in chronic fatigue syndrome: a preliminary computer tomography study

Small adrenal glands in chronic fatigue syndrome: a preliminary computer tomography study.
Authors: Scott LV, Teh J, Reznek R, Martin A, Sohaib A, Dinan TG
Department of Psychiatry, Trinity College Dublin Medical School, St. James's, Hospital, Ireland.
Journal: Psychoneuroendocrinology 1999 Oct;24(7):759-68
NLM citations: PMID: 10451910, UI: 99381217

The authors studied a group of CFS patients in whom there was evidence of inadequate functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA). In particular, they aimed to establish whether these patients had altered adrenal gland size. CFS patients (as defined by the CDC) underwent a 1 microgram adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) stimulation test (a test of adrenal gland functioning), and 8 of those with subnormal response to the test had a computer tomography assessment of their adrenal glands. The right and left adrenal gland bodies were reduced by over 50% in the CFS subjects, a result with implications for CFS pathophysiology and possibly for therapies.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10451910&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Sat, 14 Aug 1999 20:49:41 -0400

Acute effects of thirty minutes of light-intensity, intermittent exercise on patients with CFS

Acute effects of thirty minutes of light-intensity, intermittent exercise on patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.
Authors: Clapp LL, Richardson MT, Smith JF, Wang M, Clapp AJ, Pieroni RE
Health, Physical Education, and Recreation Department, Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos 78666, USA. ll12@swt.edu
Journal: Physical Therapy 1999 Aug;79(8):749-56.
NLM citations: PMID: 10440661, UI: 99369235

The authors tested 10 patients with CDC-defined CFS to discover whether light-intensity, intermittent physical activity exacerbated symptoms in patients with CFS immediately following exercise to 7 days following exercise Exercise consisted of 10 discontinuous 3-minute exercise bouts (separated by 3 minutes of recovery) at a self-selected, comfortable walking pace on a treadmill. Results indicated that degree of disability, general health status, symptoms, and mood did not change immediately and up to 7 days following this type of exercise, although all ten patients felt that the exercise could not have been continuous for 30 minutes without symptom exacerbation.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10440661&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Mon, 9 Aug 1999 14:30:08 -0400

Orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and adolescent CFS

Patterns of orthostatic intolerance: The orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and adolescent chronic fatigue.
Authors: Stewart JM, Gewitz MH, Weldon A, Munoz J
Journal of Pediatrics 1999 Aug;135(2):218-225
NLM citation: PMID: 10431117

The authors used electrocardiography and arterial tonometry to study the similarities and differences between chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and patterns of orthostatic intolerance during head-up tilt (HUT). Among other results, they found that orthostatic symptoms were similar but more severe in patients with CFS compared with patients with orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (OTS). The authors concluded that the symptoms and patterns of orthostatic heart rate and blood pressure change in OTS overlap strongly with those of CFS, and that orthostatic intolerance in OTS may represent a weakened form of chronic fatigue pathophysiology.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10431117&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Fri, 30 Jul 1999 00:13:18 -0400

Differences in adrenal steroid profile in CFS, in depression and in health

Differences in adrenal steroid profile in chronic fatigue syndrome, in depression and in health
Authors: Scott LV, Salahuddin F, Cooney J, Svec F, Dinan TG
Department of Psychiatry, Trinity College Medical School, Dublin, Ireland.
Journal of Affective Disorders 1999 Jul;54(1-2):129-37
NLM citations: PMID: 10403156, UI: 99329950

The authors found that dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulphate derivative (DHEA-S) levels were significantly lower in the CFS group compared to the healthy group; DHEA-S levels, but not DHEA, were lower in the depressives; cortisol and 17-alpha-hydroxyprogesterone did not differ between the three groups. They suggest a possible role for DHEA as both a therapy and a diagnostic tool for CFS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10403156&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Fri, 23 Jul 1999 00:41:34 -0400

Five articles on FMS in July 1999 Journal of Rheumatology

Increased concentrations of nerve growth factor in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with fibromyalgia.
Authors: Giovengo SL, Russell IJ, Larson AA
Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, University of Minnesota, St. Paul 55108, USA.
Journal of Rheumatology 1999 Jul;26(7):1564-9
NLM citations: PMID: 10405946, UI: 99334418

The authors measured the concentrations of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of "patients with primary fibromyalgia syndrome (FM), fibromyalgia associated with other secondary conditions (SFM), patients with other painful conditions but lacking fibromyalgia (OTHER), and healthy controls." They found that the mean concentration of NGF measured in patients with FM was significantly increased (41.8 12.7 pg/ml) compared to controls (9.1 4.1 pg/ml), but with large variability. The other groups of patients did not have elevated levels compared to controls, suggesting that "a central mechanism, involving abnormalities in neuropeptides such as NGF, may be a factor in the pathogenesis of FM."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10405946&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b


The London Fibromyalgia Epidemiology Study: the prevalence of fibromyalgia syndrome in London, Ontario.
Authors: White KP, Speechley M, Harth M, Ostbye T
Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
kevin.white@lhsc.on.ca
Journal of Rheumatology 1999 Jul;26(7):1570-6
NLM citations: PMID: 10405947, UI: 99334419

A study of non-institutionalized adults in London, Ontario found that FM is a common musculoskeletal disorder among Canadian adults, especially among women and persons of lower socioeconomic status. Female sex, middle age, less education, lower household income, being divorced, and being disabled were found to be associated with increased odds of having FM.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10405947&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b


The London Fibromyalgia Epidemiology Study: comparing the demographic and clinical characteristics in 100 random community cases of fibromyalgia versus controls.
Authors: White KP, Speechley M, Harth M, Ostbye T
Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
kevin.white@lhsc.on.ca
Journal of Rheumatology 1999 Jul;26(7):1577-85
NLM citations: PMID: 10405948, UI: 99334420

The authors found that in the general population, adults who meet the 1990 American College of Rheumatology definition of FM appear to have distinct features compared to those with chronic widespread pain who do not meet criteria.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10405948&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b


Effects of selective slow wave sleep disruption on musculoskeletal pain and fatigue in middle aged women.
Authors: Lentz MJ, Landis CA, Rothermel J, Shaver JL
Department of Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems, University of Washington, Seattle 98195-7266, USA.
Journal of Rheumatology 1999 Jul;26(7):1586-92
NLM citations: PMID: 10405949, UI: 99334421

The authors attempted to determine whether disrupted slow wave sleep (SWS) would evoke musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, and an alpha electroencephalograph (EEG) sleep pattern and concluded that disrupted sleep is probably an important factor in the pathophysiology of symptoms in fibromyalgia.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10405949&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b


A survey of outcome measurement procedures in routine rheumatology outpatient practice in Australia.
Authors: Bellamy N, Muirden KD, Brooks PM, Barraclough D, Tellus MM, Campbell J
Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Journal of Rheumatology 1999 Jul;26(7):1593-9
NLM citations: PMID: 10405950, UI: 99334422

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10405950&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Wed, 7 Jul 1999 12:19:08 -0400 by Roger Burns

MCS Consensus Definition Issued

[Many CFS patients also have MCS (multiple chemical sensitivities). The paper referenced below about the new MCS definition in part discusses the overlap between MCS and CFS.]


Date: Tue, 06 Jul 1999 18:18:03 -0400
From: Albert Donnay

34 RESEARCHERS AND CLINICIANS PUBLISH
CONSENSUS DEFINITION OF MCS
IN ARCHIVES OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

I am pleased to announce publication of the first consensus definition of Multiple Chemical Sensitivity:

Barta et al. Multiple Chemical Sensitivity: A 1999 Consensus. Archives of Environmental Health 1999; 54(3) 147-149).

The consensus is signed by 34 researchers and clinicians with diverse MCS experience. It specifies 6 criteria for the clinical diagnosis of MCS, the first 5 of which (below) are taken from a survey of 89 other clinicians with various perspectives on MCS published in 1993 (see Nethercott JR et al. Multiple chemical sensitivities syndrome: toward a working case definition. Arch Environ Health 1993; 48:19-26).

1. "The symptoms are reproducible with repeated [chemical] exposure."
2. "The condition is chronic."
3. "Low levels of exposure [lower than previously or commonly tolerated] result in manifestations of the syndrome."
4. "The symptoms improve or resolve when the incitants are removed."
5. "Responses occur to multiple chemically unrelated substances."
6. [Added in 1999]: Symptoms involve multiple organ systems.

The Archives of Environmental Health are published by Heldref Publications, which is encouraging wide distribution of the MCS consensus statement. It has issued a press release about the consensus statement and posted both the abstract and full text on its web site at http://heldref.org/html/Consensus.html The consensus statement also includes a review of epidemiological data on the high prevalence of MCS among both the general population and Gulf War veterans and the substantial overlap of MCS with both chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia (FM).

MCS Referral & Resources encourages clinicians and researchers specializing in any one of these disorders to screen routinely for all three using this new 1999 consensus definition of MCS, the 1994 consensus definition of CFS (Annals of Int Med 1994; 121:953-959), and the 1990 consensus definition of FM (Arth & Rheum 1990; 33:160-172).

Anyone wishing to comment on the MCS consensus statement for publication should send a formal letter to the editor of the Archives of Environmental Health, Dr. Kaye Kilburn, 2025 Zonal Ave, CSC201, Los Angeles CA 90033.

If you have any informal comments about this consensus, please post them to the Occupational & Environmental Medicine List occ-env-med-l@list.mc.duke.edu (see that list's web page at http://occ-env-med.mc.duke.edu/oem/occ-env-.htm.

-- Albert Donnay, MHS
President, MCS Referral & Resources, Inc.
adonnay@mcsrr.org, www.mcsrr.org
508 Westgate Rd, Baltimore MD 21229
410-362-6400, fax 410-362-6401

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Posted to Co-Cure Wed, 9 June 1999

Hydrotherapy for fibromyalgia

Medizinalbader zur therapie der generalisierten fibromyalgie
[Hydrotherapy for fibromyalgia]
[The article is in German but the abstract is in English]
Authors: Ammer K, Melnizky P
Ludwig Boltzmann Forschungsstelle fur Physikalische Diagnostik, Wien. Journal: Forschende Komplementarmedizin, 1999 Apr;6(2 Suppl 2):80-5
NLM citation: PMID: 10352370

The authors studied whether whirl baths with plain water or with water containing pine oil or valerian have a different influence on pain, disturbed sleep or tender point count. They found that valerian baths improved well-being and sleep significantly and decreased the tender point count significantly. Pine oil added to the bath water resulted in a significant improvement of well-being, but also in a significant decrease of pain threshold [increase in pain] of the shinbone and the right deltoid muscle. Whirl baths in plain water reduced general and maximum pain intensity significantly.

The entire abstract can be viewed at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10352370&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Tue, 8 June 1999

Desmopressin augments pituitary-adrenal responsivity to corticotropin-releasing hormone

Desmopressin augments pituitary-adrenal responsivity to corticotropin-releasing hormone in subjects with chronic fatigue syndrome and in healthy volunteers.

Authors: Scott LV, Medbak S, Dinan TG
Department of Psychiatry, Trinity College Medical School, St. James' Hospital, Dublin, Ireland.
Journal: Biological Psychiatry 1999 Jun 1;45(11):1447-54
NLM citations: PMID: 10356627, UI: 99285115

It has been suggested that chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) may be caused by a central deficiency of corticotopin-releasing hormone (CRH). The authors administered 100 micrograms of ovine CRH (oCRH) and 10 micrograms desmopressin (DDAVP), both alone and in combination, to a group of subjects with CFS and to a group of healthy volunteers. They found that "DDAVP augments CRH-mediated pituitary-adrenal responsivity in healthy subjects and in patients with CFS [and also that] DDAVP was capable of normalizing the pituitary-adrenal response to oCRH in the CFS group, [suggesting] there may be increased vasopressinergic responsivity of the anterior pituitary in CFS and/or that DDAVP may be exerting an effect at an adrenal level".

[The authors note that corticotopin-releasing hormone (CRH) and vasopressin (VP) are "the two principal neuropeptide regulators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis". Desmopressin is a synthetic version of vasopressin.]

The entire abstract can be viewed at:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10356627&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Thu, 3 June 1999

Nefazodone for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

Nefazodone for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.
Author: Hickie I
St George Hospital and Community Service, Kogarah, New South Wales, Australia. i.hickie@unsw.edu.au
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry 1999 Apr;33(2):278-80
NLM citations: PMID: 10336228, UI: 99267270

The author investigated the use of the antidepressant compound nefazodone for relief of various symptoms seen in CFS. 8 of the 10 patients in the study reported at least some improvement in fatigue, with four reporting moderate or marked symptom relief. Some patients also saw improvement in sleep disturbance, mood and overall levels of function.

The entire abstract can be viewed at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10336228&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Thu, 3 June 1999

Chronic fatigue syndrome and nickel allergy

Chronic fatigue syndrome and nickel allergy.
Authors: Marcusson JA, Lindh G, Evengard B
Department of Dermatology, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Journal: Contact Dermatitis 1999 May;40(5):269-72
NLM citations: PMID: 10344482, UI: 99274279

CFS patients and controls were patch tested with 8 metal allergens. Allergy to nickel was significantly different for the two groups and may be a factor in the etiology of CFS.

The entire abstract can be viewed at:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10344482&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Contact Co-Cure support personnel through our on-line form or by sending an email message to Co-Cure-Mod@listserv.nodak.edu.

Note: All abstract summaries, unless otherwise noted, were prepared by Margaret Bailey.

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