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Posted to Co-Cure Wed, 1 Dec 1999 22:16:42 -0500

Struggling for dignity while living with fibromyalgia

Struggling for dignity: the meaning of women's experiences of living with fibromyalgia.
Authors: Soderberg S, Lundman B, Norberg A
Boden University College of Health Sciences, Sweden. Siv.Soderberg@nll.se
Journal: Qualitative Health Research 1999 Sep;9(5):575-87
NLM citations: PMID: 10558368, UI: 99417868

The authors studied 14 women with FM, finding that being a woman with FM means living a life greatly influenced by the illness as it affects them with loss of freedom, threat to integrity, and a struggle to achieve relief and understanding.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10558368&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Sun, 28 Nov 1999 10:44:09 -0500

Corticomotor excitability and perception of effort during sustained exercise in CFS

Corticomotor excitability and perception of effort during sustained exercise in the chronic fatigue syndrome.
Authors: Sacco P, Hope PA, Thickbroom GW, Byrnes ML, Mastaglia FL
Australian Neuromuscular Research Institute, QE II Medical Centre, Nedlands, WA, Australia. psacco@cyllene.uwa.edu.au
Journal: Clinical Neurophysiology (ISSN 0069-4827) 1999 Nov;110(11):1883-91
NLM citations: PMID: 10576483, UI: 20041902

The authors used transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex to study "the possibility of a central basis for the complaints of fatigue and poor exercise tolerance in subjects with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)". Results showed differences between the CFS group and the control group in mean endurance time, ratings of perceived exertion, motor-evoked potential amplitude, post-excitatory silent period duration, and interpolated twitch force amplitude during exercise. The authors concluded that these findings support the connection between increased perception of effort in CFS and diminution in central motor drive.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10576483&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Sun, 28 Nov 1999 10:11:58 -0500

Brain MRI abnormalities exist in a subset of patients with CFS

Brain MRI abnormalities exist in a subset of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.
Authors: Lange G, DeLuca J, Maldjian JA, Lee H, Tiersky LA, Natelson BH
Department of Psychiatry, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School,
MSB E-561, 185 S. Orange Avenue, Newark, NJ, USA
Journal of the Neurological Sciences (ISSN 0022-510X) 1999 Dec 1;171(1):3-7
NLM citation: PMID: 10567042

The authors studied MRI results in three groups: CFS-Psych, CFS-No psych, and healthy controls (HC). (Those designated CFS-Psych had been diagnosed with psychiatric illness since CFS onset). "The CFS-No Psych group showed a significantly larger number of brain abnormalities on T2 weighted images than the CFS-Psych and HC groups", with cerebral changes consisting mostly of "small, punctate, subcortical white matter hyperintensities, found predominantly in the frontal lobes." The authors conclude that this finding could explain the "more severe cognitive impairment previously reported in this subset of CFS patients."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10567042&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Wed, 24 Nov 1999 18:06:14 -0500

Prognostic factors for the development of FM in women with self-reported musculoskeletal pain

Prognostic factors for the development of fibromyalgia in women with self-reported musculoskeletal pain. A prospective study.
Authors: Forseth KO, Husby G, Gran JT, Forre O
Center for Rheumatic Diseases, Rikshospitalet, University of Oslo, Norway.
Journal of Rheumatology 1999 Nov;26(11):2458-67
NLM citations: PMID: 10555910, UI: 20022836

The authors studied women with self-reported pain in 1990 and 1995 to assess what factors might be found to predict the development of FMS among women with either widespread or limited pain. Major predictive factors included the number of symptoms, duration of pain, the presence of back pain, alternately hard/loose stools, self-assessed depression, and unrefreshing sleep.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10555910&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Sat, 27 Nov 1999 09:58:23 -0500

Absence of evidence of Borna disease virus infection in Swedish patients with CFS

Absence of evidence of Borna disease virus infection in Swedish patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.
Authors: Evengard B, Briese T, Lindh G, Lee S, Lipkin WI
Department of Immunology, Microbiology, Pathology and Infectious Diseases, Clinic for Infectious Diseases I73, Karolinska Institutet at Huddinge University Hospital, S-141 86 Huddinge, Sweden.
Journal of Neurovirology (ISSN 1355-0284) 1999 Oct;5(5):495-499
NLM citation: PMID: 10568886

The authors found no specific immunoreactivity to Borna disease virus (BVD) proteins in sera from 169 Swedish CFS patients or 62 controls. No BDV N- or P-gene transcripts were found through RT - PCR analysis of PBMC from 18 patients with severe CFS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10568886&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Fri, 26 Nov 1999 18:05:31 -0500

CFS as an example of the social course of chronic illness

Toward a model of social course in chronic illness: the example of chronic fatigue syndrome.
Author: Ware NC
Department of Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
Journal: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry (ISSN 0165-005X) 1999 Sep;23(3):303-31
NLM citations: PMID: 10572737, UI: 20039032

The authors used narrative patient accounts of life with CFS to study how people with chronic illness experience and fight against marginalization in their social lives.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10572737&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Fri, 26 Nov 1999 17:55:42 -0500

Attention and Information Processing Efficiency in Patients with CFS

Attention and Information Processing Efficiency in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.
Authors: Michiels V, de Gucht V, Cluydts R, Fischler B
Free University of Brussels (VUB), Belgium
Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology (ISSN 1380-3395) 1999 Oct;21(5):709-729
NLM citation: PMID: 10572289

In a study of attentional tests and a verbal memory tasks administered to 29 people with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and 22 healthy controls, the authors found evidence of a global non-modality-specific attentional dysfunction in patients with CFS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10572289&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Sun, 21 Nov 1999 13:24:31 -0500

Baillieres Clinical Rheumatology issue - Fibromyalgia

The third 1999 issue of Baillieres Best Practice and Research Clinical Rheumatology (aka Bailliere's Best Practice in Clinical Rheumatology) is devoted to "Musculoskeletal Issues: Part II - Generalised". The articles related to fibromyalgia are listed below with hyperlinks to their abstracts.

[ The Medline citations included below name this issue as the September issue, but the publisher states the journal is published each February, May, August and November, and these articles seem to be from the August issue, which would be #3. The publisher's web site is
http://www.wbsaunders.com/catalog/wbs-prod.pl?0950-3579 ]

White KP, et al.
The occurrence and impact of generalized pain.
Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):379-89.
PMID: 10562368; UI: 20023790
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10562368&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

Reilly PA
The differential diagnosis of generalized pain.
Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):391-401.
PMID: 10562369; UI: 20023791.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10562369&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

Macfarlane GJ.
Generalized pain, fibromyalgia and regional pain: an epidemiological view.
Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):403-14.
PMID: 10562370; UI: 20023792.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10562370&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

Makela MO
Is fibromyalgia a distinct clinical entity? The epidemiologist's evidence.
Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):415-9.
PMID: 10562371; UI: 20023793.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10562371&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

Cohen ML
Is fibromyalgia a distinct clinical entity? The disapproving rheumatologist's evidence.
Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):421-5.
PMID: 10562372; UI: 20023794
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10562372&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

Wessely S, et al.
Is fibromyalgia a distinct clinical entity? Historical and epidemiological evidence.
Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):427-36.
PMID: 10562373; UI: 20023795.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10562373&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

Fitzcharles MA
Is fibromyalgia a distinct clinical entity? The approving rheumatologist's evidence.
Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):437-43.
PMID: 10562374; UI: 20023796
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10562374&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

Russell IJ
Is fibromyalgia a distinct clinical entity? The clinical investigator's evidence.
Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):445-54.
PMID: 10562375; UI: 20023797.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10562375&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

Henriksson KG
Is fibromyalgia a distinct clinical entity? Pain mechanisms in fibromyalgia syndrome. A myologist's view.
Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):455-61.
PMID: 10562376; UI: 20023798.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10562376&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

Thorson K
Is fibromyalgia a distinct clinical entity? The patient's evidence.
Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):463-7.
PMID: 10562377; UI: 20023799.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10562377&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

Schachna L, et al.
Primary care and specialist management options.
Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):469-77.
PMID: 10562378; UI: 20023800.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10562378&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

Buskila D.
Drug therapy.
Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):479-85.
PMID: 10562379; UI: 20023801.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10562379&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

Berman BM, et al.
Complementary medicine treatments for fibromyalgia syndrome.
Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):487-92.
PMID: 10562380; UI: 20023802.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10562380&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

Keel P
Pain management strategies and team approach.
Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):493-506.
PMID: 10562381; UI: 20023803.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10562381&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

Sim J, et al.
Physical and other non-pharmacological interventions for fibromyalgia.
Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):507-23.
PMID: 10562382; UI: 20023804.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10562382&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

Thomas E, et al.
Fibromyalgia as a national issue: the French example.
Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):525-9.
PMID: 10562383; UI: 20023805.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10562383&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

Gordon DA
Chronic widespread pain as a medico-legal issue.
Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):531-43.
PMID: 10562384; UI: 20023806
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10562384&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Wed, 17 Nov 1999 13:06:30 -0500

Possible association of fibromyalgia with a polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene regulatory region

Possible association of fibromyalgia with a polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene regulatory region.
Authors: Offenbaecher M, Bondy B, de Jonge S, Glatzeder K, Kruger M, Schoeps P, Ackenheil M; University Hospital, Munich, Germany.
Journal: Arthritis and Rheumatism 1999 Nov;42(11):2482-8
NLM citations: PMID: 10555044, UI: 20021515

[Note: For information on the term "promoter", see http://www.graylab.ac.uk/cgi-bin/omd?query=promoter ]

The authors used polymerase chain reaction to analyze the genotypes of the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT) in patients with fibromyalgia and in controls. They discuss the distributions of the various genotypes found in each group, including a finding of altered serotonin metabolism in at least some people with FMS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10555044&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Thu, 18 Nov 1999 02:06:44 -0500

Mycoplasma research and how it's related to CFIDS

CFS Update (from Lisa Lorden, the About.com CFS guide)
November 17, 1999 - Vol. 1, No. 26

Mycoplasma Infection
Everything you need to know about mycoplasma research and how it's related to CFIDS.

http://chronicfatigue.about.com/library/weekly/aa012799.htm

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Posted to Co-Cure Tue, 9 Nov 1999 17:16:28 -0500

Concentration and Memory Deficits in Patients with FMS

Concentration and Memory Deficits in Patients with Fibromyalgia Syndrome.
Authors: Grace GM, Nielson WR, Hopkins MA, Berg MA
London Health Sciences Centre, Psychological Services and Clinical Neurological Sciences Ontario, ONT, Canada
Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology 1999 Aug;21(4):477-487
NLM citation: PMID: 10550807

The authors compared 30 patients with fibromyalgia (FMS) to 30 matched healthy control subjects on standardized measures of attention, concentration, and memory as well as subjective ratings of memory abilities and sleep quality. Patients with FMS performed more poorly on tests of immediate and delayed recall, and sustained auditory concentration, and results indicated significant correlations between performance on memory and concentration measures and scores on questionnaires of pain severity and trait (general tendency towards) anxiety.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10550807&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Wed, Mon, 8 Nov 1999 10:16:56 -0500

Impaired oxygen delivery to muscle in chronic fatigue syndrome

Impaired oxygen delivery to muscle in chronic fatigue syndrome
Authors: McCully KK, Natelson BH
Department of Medicine, Medical College of Pennsylvania and Hahnemann University, Philadelphia, PA 19129, U.S.A.
Journal: Clinical Science (Colch) 1999 Nov 1;97(5):603-608
NLM citation: PMID: 10545311

The authors found that oxygen delivery was reduced in CDC-defined CFS patients compared with that in sedentary controls, consistent with previous studies showing abnormal autonomic control of blood flow.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10545311&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Wed, 3 Nov 1999 17:27:20 -0500 by Fred Springfield

Five-Year Follow-Up of Young People with CFS Following IV Gammaglobulin Trial

Five-Year Follow-Up of Young People with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Following the Double Blind Randomised Controlled Intravenous Gammaglobulin Trial
Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (The Haworth Medical Press, an imprint of The Haworth Press, Inc.) Vol. 5, No. 3/4, 1999
Katherine S. Rowe, MBBS, MD, MPH, Dip Ed (Lond), FRACP

SUMMARY. Three and 5 year follow-up studies of eighty-nine young people with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome who completed a double blind randomised controlled trial of intravenous gammaglobulin has been conducted to determine whether the improvement following the intravenous gammaglobulin was sustained.

Initial telephone contact and a questionnaire that assessed functional outcomes including, physical activity, social activities, work/school attendance and work/school workload was used. Strategies and treatment that were found helpful and ways to improve management were also asked.

Follow-up data were obtained on 86 of 89 after the study concluded. The 3-year follow-up yielded a 75% response to the questionnaire. A 78% follow up response rate at 5 years was achieved for those enrolled in the study with 84% (n = 74) of those who completed the study being traced. The mean follow-up time from commencement of illness was 56 months (s.d. 25 months), range 15-112 months. There was no persistent deterioration in function related to CFS in any young person. Four had reported recurrence of symptoms lasting 3-8 months and again improved. Others remained 'improved' or continued to improve.

Seventeen per cent of those who responded were still moderately unwell with another 23%) 'not back to normal yet.' Sixty per cent of participants considered they were 'well' at the last follow-up with 45% scoring 10/10. Seventeen (20%) had another condition during or after their illness. Anergy or hypoergy did not predict functional outcome at five years after the trial, although an earlier improvement was noted in those who were anergic and who received gammaglobulin.

There was no deterioration in overall function over the 5 years following participation in the gammaglobulin trial, and young people continued to improve although a significant number were still disabled. The significance of the abnormal delayed type hypersensitivity reaction for the response to gammaglobulin is uncertain and warrants further investigation. [ Article copies available for a fee from The Haworth Document Delivery Service: 1-800-342-9678. E-mail address: getinfo@haworthpressinc.com .]

KEYWORDS. Chronic fatigue syndrome, adolescents, gammaglobulin, clinical trial, follow-up

Katherine S. Rowe is Physician, Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia 3052.

Address correspondence to: Dr. Katherine S. Rowe, Department of Paediatrics, Royal Children's Hospital, Flemington Road, Parkville, Victoria, Australia 3052 (E-mail: rowe@cryptic.rch.unimelb.edu.au).

The willingness of the young people with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome to participate in our studies, and to teach us so much is greatly appreciated. David Rowe's assistance with 'detective work' in following up the young people is gratefully acknowledged.

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Posted to Co-Cure Wed, 3 Nov 1999 11:17:46 -0500 by Carolyn Viviani

Vaccine Contamination May Expose Children to Stealth Virus Infection

Children might be exposed to increased risk of stealth virus infection from using contaminated vaccines. An article written by Dr. John Martin explains this increased risk and talks about the efforts of government agencies to keep the truth about vaccine contamination and vaccine testing procedures from being known by both physicians and the public.

http://listserv.nodak.edu/cgi-bin/wa.exe?A2=ind9911a&L=co-cure&F=&S=&P=2080

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Posted to Co-Cure Tue, 2 Nov 1999 21:25:58 -0500

TNF-alpha and chronic fatigue syndrome

TNF-alpha and chronic fatigue syndrome.
Authors: Moss RB, Mercandetti A, Vojdani A E-Mail: shotdoc@imnr.com
Journal of Clinical Immunology 1999 Sep;19(5):314-6
NLM citations: PMID: 10535608, UI: 20004266

[Note: TNF-alpha is the human tumor necrosis factor alpha, a protein of 157 amino acids with a wide range of pro-inflammatory actions, usually considered to be a cytokine.]

This study suggests a significant increase of serum TNF-alpha in patients with CFS compared to non-CFS controls, supporting further examination of the role of proinflammatory mediators in CFS and the clinical testing of TNF-alpha blockers and other anti-inflammatory agents for treatment.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10535608&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Tue, 2 Nov 1999 10:09:10 -0500

Cortical motor potential alterations in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Cortical motor potential alterations in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.
Authors: Gordon R, Michalewski HJ, Nguyen T, Gupta S, Starr A
Department of Neurology, University of California, Irvine, Med. Surge I, Room 154, Irvine, CA 92697-4290, USA.
Journal: International Journal of Molecular Medicine 1999 Nov;4(5):493-499
NLM citation: PMID: 10534571

Patients with CFS showed slowed reaction times and reduced premovement-related potentials, suggesting that central motor mechanisms accompanying motor response preparation were impaired in CFS for some tasks. Measures of neural processes related to both sensory encoding and to stimulus classification were normal.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10534571&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Contact Co-Cure support personnel through our on-line form or by sending an email message to Co-Cure-Mod@listserv.nodak.edu.

Note: All abstract summaries, unless otherwise noted, were prepared by Margaret Bailey.

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