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Posted to Co-Cure Mon, 7 Feb 2000 20:26:07 +0100 by Ted Nilson

A 37 kDa 2-5A binding protein as a potential biochemical marker for chronic fatigue syndrome

The American Journal of Medicine: Volume 108 Issue 2 (February 2000) Pages 99-105
A 37 kDa 2-5A binding protein as a potential biochemical marker for chronic fatigue syndrome
Kenny De Meirleir (a), Catherine Bisbal (b), Isabelle Campine (a), Pascale De Becker (a), Tamim Salehzada (b), Edith Demettre (b) and Bernard Lebleu (b)
. [a]Department of Human Physiology and Medicine (KDM, IC, PDB), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium [b]Molecular Genetics Institute (CB, TS, ED, BL), Université Montpellier II, Montpellier, France
Requests for reprints should be addressed to Prof. Dr. K. De Meirleir, V.U.B. KRO gebouw-1, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussel, Belgium
Manuscript received 3 August 1998 Revised 15 July 1999 Accepted 15 July 1999;
Abstract

PURPOSE: Recent studies have revealed abnormalities in the ribonuclease L pathway in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome. We conducted a blinded study to detect possible differences in the distribution of 2-5A binding proteins in the cells of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and controls.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied 57 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and 53 control subjects (28 healthy subjects and 25 patients with depression or fibromyalgia). A radioactive probe was used to label 2-5A binding proteins in unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cell extracts and to compare their distribution in the three groups.

RESULTS: A 37 kDa 2-5A binding polypeptide was found in 50 (88%) of the 57 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome compared with 15 (28%) of the 53 controls (P <0.01). When present, the amount of 37 kDa protein was very low in the control groups. When expressed as the ratio of the 37 kDa protein to the 80 kDa protein, 41 (72%) of the 57 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome had a ratio >0.05, compared with 3 (11%) of the 28 healthy subjects and none of the patients with fibromyalgia or depression.

CONCLUSION: The presence of a 37 kDa 2-5A binding protein in extracts of peripheral blood mononuclear cells may distinguish patients with chronic fatigue syndrome from healthy subjects and those suffering from other diseases.

Full article

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Posted to Co-Cure Sun, 6 Feb 2000 12:38:41 -0500

Stress can induce neuroendocrine disorders and pain

[Approximate title in English: Stress can induce neuroendocrine disorders and pain. Article in Swedish]
Author: Anderberg UM
Association: Institutionen for neurovetenskap, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala.
Journal: Lakartidningen 1999 Dec 8;96(49):5497-9
NLM citations: PMID: 10643244, UI: 20107856

A number of hormones and neuropeptides regulating pain, well-being and stress are shown to play important roles in the association between stress perception and pain reception. Long-lasting derangements in the stress axis may induce several neuroendocrine modifications, giving rise to many of the symptoms seen in chronic pain syndromes, including fibromyalgia.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10643244&dopt=Abstract

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Posted to Co-Cure Sat, 5 Feb 2000 22:21:05 -0500

CFS in two studies of Gulf War Syndrome

Antibodies to Squalene in Gulf War Syndrome.
Authors: Asa PB, Cao Y, Garry RF
Affiliation: Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tulane Medical School, 1430 Tulane Avenue, New Orleans, Louisiana, 70112
Journal: Experimental Molecular Pathology 2000 Feb;68(1):55-64
NLM citation: PMID: 10640454

The authors studied the correlation between serum antibodies to squalene and the signs and symptoms of GWS. All participants were immunized for service in Desert Shield/Desert Storm during 1990-1991 and included Gulf War-era veterans or military employees, blood donors, and people with lupus, silicone breast implants, and chronic fatigue syndrome. 95% of overtly-ill deployed GWS patients and 100% of overtly ill- non-deployed GWS patients had antibodies to squalene. The other groups were negative to detectable squalene antibodies. [The primary author confirmed with Co-Cure moderators that study participants with CFS were one of the negative control groups.]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10640454&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b


Psychiatric diagnoses in Gulf War veterans with fatiguing illness.
Authors: Lange G, Tiersky L, DeLuca J, Peckerman A, Pollet C, Policastro T, Scharer J, Ottenweller JE, Fiedler N, Natelson BH
Affiliation: Center for Environmental Hazards Research, VA Medical Center, East Orange, NJ, USA. E-Mail:
Psychiatry Research (ISSN 0165-1781) 1999 Dec 13;89(1):39-48
NLM citations: PMID: 10643876, UI: 20106670

The authors studied Gulf War veterans who had Gulf War Illness and severe fatigue and who also fulfilled clinical case definitions for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Idiopathic Chronic Fatigue, and/or Multiple Chemical Sensitivity. The veterans were assessed for the presence of DSM-III-R Axis I psychiatric disorders. The authors concluded that the presence of such disorders cannot explain symptoms of Gulf War Illness among all Persian Gulf veterans with severe fatiguing illness.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10643876&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Wed, 2 Feb 2000 20:49:13 -0500

Hepatitis C as a factor in fibromyalgia

Relation between infection and autoimmunity in mixed cryoglobulinemia.
Authors: Ferri C, Zignego AL
Affiliation: Dipartimento Medicina Interna, Rheumatology Unit, University of Pisa, Italy. E-Mail: c.ferri@int.med.unipi.it
Journal: Current Opinion in Rheumatology (ISSN 1040-8711) 2000 Jan;12(1):53-60
NLM citations: PMID: 10647955, UI: 20112481

The authors discuss fibromyalgia and a variety of other autoimmune-lymphoproliferative diseases which may have hepatitis C virus infection as a causal factor.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10647955&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Fri, 28 Jan 2000 22:19:43 -0500

Autonomic function in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

Autonomic function in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.
Authors: Soetekouw PM, Lenders JW, Bleijenberg G, Thien T, van der Meer JW
Affiliation: Department of Medicine, St. Radboud University Hospital, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
Journal: Clinical Autonomic Research (ISSN 0959-9851) 1999 Dec;9(6):334-40
NLM citations: PMID: 10638807, UI: 20102345

The authors examined 37 CFS patients and 38 healthy controls to assess cardiovascular responsiveness in 37 CFS patients and 38 healthy controls. Blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were recorded continuously before and during forced breathing, standing up, Valsalva maneuver, and sustained handgrip exercise (HG); a mental arithmetic test (MA) and questionnaires were used to assess the severity of CFS symptoms. Various differences were found between the two groups in differences between the in- and expiratory HR, maximal increase in HR during standing, systolic and diastolic blood pressure responses, ability to sustain the Valsalva maneuver, HR response to the mental arithmetic test (suggesting impaired cardiac sympathetic responsiveness to mental stress), and the hemodynamic responses in the handgrip exercise. The authors concluded from their findings that there are no gross alterations in cardiovascular autonomic function in patients with CFS.

(For a definition of the Valsalva maneuver, see http://www.graylab.ac.uk/cgi-bin/omd?query=Valsalva)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10638807&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Fri, 28 Jan 2000 21:59:21 -0500

Depression and fibromyalgia: why aren't all patients depressed?

Evaluation of the relationship between depression and fibromyalgia syndrome: why aren't all patients depressed?
Authors: Okifuji A, Turk DC, Sherman JJ
Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology, University of Washington, Seattle 98195, USA.
Journal of Rheumatology 2000 Jan;27(1):212-9
NLM citations: PMID: 10648041, UI: 20112567

The authors studied the factors that differentiate FM patients with and without depressive disorders, finding that 39 of 69 patients met criteria for depressive disorder. They concluded that depressive disorders are prevalent in FM and may be independent of the major features of FM, namely, pain severity and hypersensitivity to pressure pain, but are related to the cognitive appraisals of the effects of symptoms on daily life and functional activities.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10648041&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Tue, 25 Jan 2000 19:27:49 -0500 by Fred Springfield

Overlapping Conditions Among Patients With CFS, FM & TMD

Overlapping Conditions Among Patients With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, and Temporomandibular Disorder
Arch Intern Med. 2000;160:221-227
Leslie A. Aaron, PhD, MPH; Mary M. Burke, MD; Dedra Buchwald, MD

Background: Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), fibromyalgia (FM), and temporomandibular disorder (TMD) share many clinical illness features such as myalgia, fatigue, sleep disturbances, and impairment in ability to perform activities of daily living as a consequence of these symptoms. A growing literature suggests that a variety of comorbid illnesses also may commonly coexist in these patients, including irritable bowel syndrome, chronic tension-type headache, and interstitial cystitis.

Objective: To describe the frequency of 10 clinical conditions among patients with CFS, FM, and TMD compared with healthy controls with respect to past diagnoses, degree to which they manifested symptoms for each condition as determined by expert-based criteria, and published diagnostic criteria.

Methods: Patients diagnosed as having CFS, FM, and TMD by their physicians were recruited from hospital-based clinics. Healthy control subjects from a dermatology clinic were enrolled as a comparison group. All subjects completed a 138-item symptom checklist and underwent a brief physical examination performed by the project physicians.

Results: With little exception, patients reported few past diagnoses of the 10 clinical conditions beyond their referring diagnosis of CFS, FM, or TMD. In contrast, patients were more likely than controls to meet lifetime symptom and diagnostic criteria for many of the conditions, including CFS, FM, irritable bowel syndrome, multiple chemical sensitivities, and headache. Lifetime rates of irritable bowel syndrome were particularly striking in the patient groups (CFS, 92%; FM, 77%; TMD, 64%) compared with controls (18%) (P<.001). Individual symptom analysis revealed that patients with CFS, FM, and TMD share common symptoms, including generalized pain sensitivity, sleep and concentration difficulties, bowel complaints, and headache. However, several symptoms also distinguished the patient groups.

Conclusions: This study provides preliminary evidence that patients with CFS, FM, and TMD share key symptoms. It also is apparent that other localized and systemic conditions may frequently co-occur with CFS, FM, and TMD. Future research that seeks to identify the temporal relationships and other pathophysiologic mechanism(s) linking CFS, FM, and TMD will likely advance our understanding and treatment of these chronic, recurrent conditions.

Note: The full article is available online at http://archinte.ama-assn.org/issues/v160n2/full/ioi81410.html

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Posted to Co-Cure Sun, 23 Jan 2000 20:50:06 -0500

Psychiatric diagnoses in Gulf War veterans with fatiguing illness

Psychiatric diagnoses in Gulf War veterans with fatiguing illness.
Authors: Lange G, Tiersky L, DeLuca J, Peckerman A, Pollet C, Policastro T, Scharer J, Ottenweller JE, Fiedler N, Natelson BH
Affiliation: Center for Environmental Hazards Research, VA Medical Center, East Orange, NJ, USA.     E-Mail: langegu@umdnj.edu
Journal: Psychiatry Research (ISSN 0165-1781) 1999 Dec 13;89(1):39-48
NLM citations: PMID: 10643876, UI: 20106670

In this study, the authors studied psychiatric illness in 95 Persian Gulf War veterans with Gulf War Illness, limiting the study to those who presented with severe fatigue as a major complaint and also fulfilled clinical case definitions for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Idiopathic Chronic Fatigue, and/or Multiple Chemical Sensitivity. They concluded that the presence of psychiatric disorders as assessed by DSM-III-R criteria cannot explain symptoms of Gulf War Illness among all Persian Gulf veterans with severe fatiguing illness.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10643876&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Sun, 23 Jan 2000 20:21:57 -0500

EMG-biofeedback and fibromyalgia

[Article in German - no title available on MedLine]
Authors: Mur E, Drexler A, Gruber J, Hartig F, Gunther V
Affiliation: Abteilung fur Allgemeine Innere Medizin, Universitatsklinik fur Innere Medizin, Physikalische Medizin und Rheumaambulanz, Innsbruck.
erich.mur@uibk.ac.at
Journal: Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift 1999;149(19-20):561-3
PMID: 10637968, UI: 20103323

The authors found that EMG-biofeedback (EMG-BFB) resulted in statistically significant improvement in pain and the symptoms of sleep disturbance and headache in FM. They recommend that EMG-BFB be used as part of a multimodal pain therapy.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10637968&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Thu, 20 Jan 2000 15:14:07 -0500

The monopolar electromyographic pin in myofascial pain therapy

The role of the monopolar electromyographic pin in myofascial pain therapy: automated twitch-obtaining intramuscular stimulation (ATOIMSSM) and electrical twitch-obtaining intramuscular stimulation.
Author: Chu J
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA.
Journal: Electromyography and Clinical Neurophysiology 1999 Dec;39(8):503-11
NLM citations: PMID: 10627937, UI: 20093407

The authors describe treatment given to two FMS patients whose pain was related to herniated disks. Treatment involved use of automated twitch-obtaining intramuscular stimulation (ATOIMS) and electrical twitch-obtaining intramuscular stimulation (ETOIMS) produced by a monopolar electromyographic pin. Significant reductions in pain levels occurred with the increase in number of ETOIMS treatment sessions. More significant pain level reductions occurred with combined ATOIMS & ETOIMS treatments. The authors concluded that the monopolar pin has a very promising role in the management of such pain using the ATOIMS and ETOIMS methods.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10627937&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Wed, 19 Jan 2000 19:26:27 -0500

Australian enquiry into immune system dysfunction that mimics CFS

Forwarded for Don Maisch emfacts@TRUMP.NET.AU

For the past 6 years I have been involved in a joint research effort to identify a particular immune system stressor that can manifest with symptoms similar to CFS and, at least in Australia, is often misdiagnosed as CFS or chronic fatigue. This enquiry, in part, arose in response to a Victorian government workers compensation case which took place in Melbourne, Australia, in 1991-1992. The case involved 4 female workers who suffered CFS like symptoms while being employed in one office. Investigations determined that an electrical substation directly under the floor was giving rise to extremely high magnetic fields in the office. All four employees recovered their previous health upon ceasing to work in that office. Since then we have further case histories that clearly indicate that in some people (mainly females) prolonged exposure to excessive magnetic fields can act as an immune system stressor.

We have published a paper on this hypothesis which is available at:
http://www.tassie.net.au/emfacts/cfs-paper.html

A case histories paper is also at:
http://www.tassie.net.au/emfacts/case-studies.html

A publication by the Swedish Union of Clerical and Technical Employees in Industry is also of interest:
http://www.tassie.net.au/emfacts/hypersens.html

We have put together a research program which is freely available to any group or organisation that may be interested in following this line of enquiry and is willing to openingly share any data collected.

Sincerely,

Don Maisch


EMFacts Consultancy
PO Box 96,
North Hobart, 7002
Tasmania, Australia
Phone: (03) 62430195
Fax: (03) 62430340
Email: emfacts@trump.net.au
ICQ: 30814841
Web: http://www.tassie.net.au/emfacts/

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Posted to Co-Cure Mon, 17 Jan 2000 16:19:47 -0500

Acute phase responses and cytokine secretion in CFS

Acute phase responses and cytokine secretion in chronic fatigue syndrome.
Authors: Cannon JG, Angel JB, Ball RW, Abad LW, Fagioli L, Komaroff AL
Department of Medicine, New England Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02111, USA. jgc2@psu.edu
Journal of Clinical Immunology 1999 Nov;19(6):414-21
NLM citations: PMID: 10634215, UI: 20097681

The authors tested the hypothesis that physical symptoms of CFS are due in part to abnormal production of or sensitivity to cytokines such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) and IL-6 under basal (beginning/resting) conditions or in response to a particular physical stress (in this case, exercise).

Testing showed basal levels of increased IL-6 secretion in people with CFS, but the differences from levels found in healthy controls were modest, and the authors concluded that cytokine dysregulation is neither a unique nor a dominant cause of CFS.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/htbin-post/Entrez/query?uid=10634215&form=6&db=m&Dopt=b

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Posted to Co-Cure Mon, 17 Jan 2000 02:50:42 -0500 by Fred Springfield

CFS - new insights and old ignorance

Chronic fatigue syndrome: new insights and old ignorance
Journal of Internal Medicine 246 455-469
Evengård B, Schacterle RS, Komaroff AL
Karolinska Institute at Huddinge, University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden; and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA
(PMID: 10583715, UI: 20050796 )

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a condition characterized by impairment of neurocognitive functions and quality of sleep and of somatic symptoms such as recurrent sore throat, muscle aches, arthralgias, headache, and postexertional malaise.

A majority of patients describe an infectious onset but the link between infections and CFS remains uncertain. Findings show an activation of the immune system, abberations in several hypothalamic-pituitary axes and involvement of other parts of the central nervous system.

The origin is bound to be complex and it may well be that the solution will come together with a more generally altered view about mind–body dualism, and the concept of illness and disease.

From:http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/Journals/processfree2.asp?contentid=jim.1999.11&filetype=abstracts&article=42171

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Posted to Co-Cure Mon, 17 Jan 2000 01:41:38 -0500 by Kimberly Hare

The potential role of hypocortisolism in the pathophysiology of stress-related bodily disorders

The potential role of hypocortisolism in the pathophysiology of stress-related bodily disorders.
J: Psychoneuroendocrinology 2000 Jan;25(1):1-35
Heim C, Ehlert U, Hellhammer DH
Center for Psychobiological and Psychosomatic Research, University of Trier, Germany.
PMID: 10633533, UI: 20099350

Representing a challenge for current concepts of stress research, a number of studies have now provided convincing evidence that the adrenal gland is hypoactive in some stress-related states. The phenomenon of hypocortisolism has mainly been described for patients, who experienced a traumatic event and subsequently developed post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

However, as presented in this review, hypocortisolism does not merely represent a specific correlate of PTSD, since similar findings have been reported for healthy individuals living under conditions of chronic stress as well as for patients with several bodily disorders. These include chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, other somatoform disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma, and many of these disorders have been related to stress.

Although hypocortisolism appears to be a frequent and widespread phenomenon, the nature of the underlying mechanisms and the homology of these mechanisms within and across clinical groups remain speculative. Potential mechanisms include dysregulations on several levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis.

In addition, factors such as genetic vulnerability, previous stress experience, coping and personality styles may determine the manifestation of this neuroendocrine abnormality.

Several authors proposed theoretical concepts on the development or physiological meaning of hypocortisolism. Based on the reviewed findings, we propose that a persistent lack of cortisol availability in traumatized or chronically stressed individuals may promote an increased vulnerability for the development of stress-related bodily disorders. This pathophysiological model may have important implications for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the classical psychosomatic disorders.

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Posted to Co-Cure Sat, 15 Jan 2000 20:27:48 -0800 by Melissa O'Toole

The Role Of Depression In Pain, Psychophysiological Syndromes And Medically Unexplained Symptoms Associated With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

The Role Of Depression In Pain, Psychophysiological Syndromes And Medically Unexplained Symptoms Associated With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.
J Affect Disord. 1999 Oct;55(2-3):143-8.
Morriss RK, Ahmed M, Wearden AJ, Mullis R, Strickland P, Appleby L, Campbell IT, Pearson D.
Department of Community Psychiatry, Royal Preston Hospital, University of Manchester, UK.
PMID: 10628883, UI: 20092505

SUMMARY: Treating depression in chronic fatigue syndrome is unlikely to diminish reporting of pain and medically unexplained symptoms but may improve social function.

BACKGROUND: The association between depression and pain, function, medically unexplained symptoms and psychophysiological syndromes such as irritable bowel syndrome has not been explored before in chronic fatigue syndrome.

METHODS: Cross-sectional controlled study of the current prevalence of psychophysiological syndromes, pain, function and lifetime prevalence of medically unexplained symptoms in 77 out-patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) without DSM-III-R depression, 42 CFS out-patients with DSM-III-R depression and 26 out-patient with primary DSM-III-R depression.

RESULTS: Both CFS groups differed significantly from the primary depression group but not each other in the prevalence of tension headaches (P < 0.001), reporting of widespread bodily pain (P < 0.001) and the number of lifetime medically unexplained symptoms (P < 0.001). The three groups did not significantly differ in the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome or fibromyalgia. CFS patients with depression were more impaired in social function than other CFS patients.

CONCLUSION: Depression is not associated with the reporting of pain, psychophysiological syndromes and medically unexplained symptoms in CFS patients. Depression is associated with decreased social function in CFS patients.

LIMITATIONS: Study depended on recall of symptoms, not confirmed by medical records and current investigations. Patients with depression were taking antidepressants.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Treating depression in chronic fatigue syndrome is unlikely to diminish reporting of pain and medically unexplained symptoms but may improve social function.

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Note: All abstract summaries, unless otherwise noted, were prepared by Margaret Bailey.


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